Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 25, 2015 3:12am-4:01am PDT

quote
3:12 am
them. >> translator: well, you are
3:13 am
right. and it is my deep belief that any actions to the contrary in order to destroy the legitimate government will create a situation which you can witness now in the other countries of the region or in other regions. for instance in libya. all of the state institutions are disintegrated. we see the similar situation in iraq. and there is no other solution to the syrian crisis than strengthening the effective government structures and rendering them help in fighting terrorism. but at the same time, urging them to engage in positive dialogue with the rational opposition and conduct reform. >> as you know some of the coalition partners want to see president assad go first. before they will support? >> translator: i would like to recommend to them the following -- they should send this message to the syrian people. it is only the syrian people who
3:14 am
are entitled to decide who should govern their country and how. >> you are much talked about in america. there is much conversation. more so than any other other person. >> maybe they have nothing else to do in america than talk about me. >> no, no. maybe they're curious people. or maybe you are an interesting character, maybe that's what it is. as you know some have called you a czar. >> so what? you know, people call me different names. >> does the nape fit? does the name fit? >> no, it does not fit me. it's not important how i am called. these are well-wishers, friends or political opponents. it is important what you think about you. what you must do for the interest of the country which has entrusted you with the possession as the head of the russian state.
3:15 am
>> are you curious about america? more than simply another nation that you have to deal with? >> of course we are curious about what is going on. america exerts enormous influence on the situation in the world as a whole. >> what do you admire most about america? >> i like the creativity. >> creativity? >> creativity when it comes to your tackling problems. their openness, open mindedness. because it allows them to unleash the inner potential of their people. and thanks to that, america has attained such amazing results in developing their country. >> charlie's interview with vladamir putin, plus candidate donald trump reveals his tax plan this sunday on the 4th season premiere of "60 minutes." the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
3:16 am
3:17 am
3:18 am
3:19 am
a new poll shows donald trump is still the front-runner in the race for the republican presidential nomination. followed by ben carson, carly fiorina, and jeb bush, the only candidates in double digits. cbs news has been investigating one of trump's businesses. that is the target of the number of lawsuits. it is the now defunct, trump university, nonaccredited school that offered among other things real estate seminars, but no degrees. here is julianna goldman.
3:20 am
>> reporter: donald trump has become the front run r because of his reputation as a businessman who gets things done. that brought unresolved lawsuits several related to trump university which his own lawyer acknowledges would likely extend into a pe totential administrat. >> particularly what i was looking for was guidance in how to finance real estate transactions. >> reporter: in 2010, former transit worker, gary smith was unemployed, and says he was desperate to make money. he saw an ad for trump university. and turned to a known brand. >> i thought he was like, you know, kind of a top-notch, guru of sorts. >> reporter: he was a big draw for you? >> definitely. >> reporter: smith spent more than $35,000 on trump university and contacted the attorney general of new york after he heard about its $40 million lawsuit against trump claiming the billionaire defrauded students and made an estimated $5 million. >> i didn't want to put my name on anything having to do with
3:21 am
education unless it was going to be the best. >> reporter: trump university began in 2004. in 2007 it started offering live events around the country. >> if you don't learn from the people we will be putting forward, all people that are hand picked by me. >> reporter: cbs news found three instructors had previously filed for bankruptcy, others like smith's instructor, james harris. were motivational speakers, paid on commission to sell additional trump training. cbs news verified at least 17 affidavits specifically mention harris who was hired in 2008. while thousands attended the three-day, $1,500 seminar around the country. the company's main revenue source was extended $35,000 mentorship, called the trump gold elite package. smith and other former students told cbs news instructors urged them to increase the credit limit on their credit card for investing and to fund their training. one former student's affidavit
3:22 am
read when people said they did not have enough money to pay for the trump elite program, mr. harris suggested using newly increased credit card limit. >> certainly wasn't something that was encouraged or implemented. >> alan garten is trump's attorney. >> with any business you will get some students who aren't satisfied. >> gary smith was told he would get support from real estate mentors but says they didn't deliver. smith concede he gave positive reviews to two mentors even writing here, i am very optimisting i will be a very successful real estate investor the in the future. >> can you point to any financial gain? >> i didn't get any financial gain. a big time net loss at this point the. >> people have to take responsibility for themselves and use the tools and move forward. as far as just simply, mr. trump is rich and should refund everyone money, trump university was not a charitable institution. >> reporter: internal 2010 memo shows employees acknowledged the
3:23 am
mentor program was too difficult to fulfill and expectations are not realistically set or met. the school stops accepting students and winding down in summer 2010. >> at trump university we teach success. >> reporter: trump's attorney cites surveys showing 98% satisfaction rate. court documents indicate of 6,700 students who signed up for the three day seminar or more, 40% received a refund. garten says it is in no way indicative of satisfaction. he says it demonstrates trump's university's refund policy. >> we provided students with valuable resources. with on line instruction. in person training. mentoring, seminars, couric -- curriculum, and it isn't so dif trent from the front-runner's presidential campaign.
3:24 am
>> behind that, the veneer is to me like, somebody that probably could care less for, the average person, and, you know people that, you know, he is dealing with in general. i think it is all about him. >> reporter: trump says student surveys show 9 #% satisfaction rate. court documents show 40% of the students who signed contracts asked for their money back and got it. trump's attorney says that demonstrates a generous refund policy. >> schoolkid are very excite add but someone who is coming to see them tomorrow. we will have their story next. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
the pope this evening in st. patrick's cathedral in new york. children, especially, are drawn to francis. and he will be visiting some schoolkids in harlem tomorrow. elaine quillano is there. >> reporter: for weeks students at our lady queen of angels has prepared for the pope's visit. >> i feel really excited because a lot of kids never got to meet the pope. >> reporter: this third grardde is one of six chosen by lotter tee to meet with him. >> the pope likes taking care of the poor and the environment and really loves kids. >> reporter: 8-year-old pedro hernandez can't wait to show the pope his project on the
3:28 am
environment. >> and this is recycling. because we are opening the windows. and we don't have to use the fan. >> reporter: third grader, aaron diaz wonders about the serious lung infection the pep had decades ago. >> how could he still survive when he has one lung and a half. >> reporter: nicholas marronaro and ngueubou kamwa. >> he took a selfie, wonder if he thought it was a selfie or a photo? >> do you think he has a cell phone? >> if he does probably has the flip one. probably doesn't want to spend too much money on using, getting unnecessary stuff. >> reporter: the pope's humility has left an impression on these kids. >> i think they offered him a big home in rome. and he didn't want to take it. he took a little house instead. he thought it was too fancy.
3:29 am
>> reporter: aaron diaz has a special request from his dad. >> he wants me to ask him to pray for the mets that way they can get into the playoffs. >> are you going to do that? >> i guess so. >> reporter: in the middle of a highly choreographed visit, the pope is making time for these children and their unscripted moments. elaine quillano, cbs news, new york. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news." a look at the people and events shaping your word. i'm jim axelrod. pope francis remains in the spotlight. today in new york city where he will address the united nations on its 70th anniversary. the pontiff will lead a service at 9/11 memorial. there will be a procession through central park and a mass at madison square garden. pope francis arrived in manhattan yesterday and held evening prayers at st. patrick's cathedral. here is some of what he had to say. >> this evening, my brothers and sisters. i have come to join you in prayer. that our vocations as priests
3:31 am
will continue to build up the great edifice of good's kingdom in this country. -- god's kingdom in this country. i know that in the midst of god's people you recently have suffered greatly in the not distant path by having to bear the shame of some of your brothers. brothers who have harmed and scandalized the church in the most vulnerable of her members. in the word of the book of revelation -- i know well that you have come forth from the
3:32 am
great tribulation and i accompany you at this time of pain and difficulty. and i thank god for your faithful service to his people. doing so in the hope of helping you preserve on the path of fidelity to jesus christ. and i would like to offer two brief reflections. the first concern is of the spirit of gratitude. the joy of men and women who love god attracts others to him. priests and religious are called
3:33 am
to find and radiate lasting satisfaction in their vocation. joy springs from a grateful heart. truly we have received much, so many graces, so many blessings. and in this we rejoice. it will do us good to think back on our lives with the grace of remembrance. remembrance of when we were first called. remembrance of the road traveled. remembrance of graces received. and above all, remembrance of our encounter with jesus christ
3:34 am
so often along the way. remembrance of the amazement which our encounter with jesus christ has awakened in our hearts. sisters, brothers, priests and religious, to seek the grace of remembrance so as to grow ein te spirit of gratitude. perhaps we need to ask ourselves -- are we capable of counting our blessings? or have i forgotten them? a second area is the spirit of
3:35 am
hard work. a grateful heart is spontaneously impelled to serve the lord and to find expression in a life of commitment to our work. i would especially like to thank and express my esteem and gratitude to the religious women of the united states. [ applause ] what, indeed, what would the church be without you? women of strength, fighters. with that spirit of courage which puts you on the front
3:36 am
lines in the proclamation of the gospel. to you religious women, sisters and mothers of this people, i wish to say, thank you. a big thank you. and to till yell you that i lov very much. i know -- i know that many of you are on the front lines in meeting the challenges of adapting to an evolving pastoral landscape. like st. peter, i ask you, that regardless of the difficulties
3:37 am
and trials you face, be at peace and respond to them as christ did. he gave thanks to the father, took up his cross, and looked forward. dear brothers and sisters, in a few moments we will sing the magnificate. let us join her in thanking god for the great things he has done. and for the great things he will continue to do in us. and in those whom we have the privilege to serve.
3:38 am
>> the ever since darryl's wife started using gain flings, their laundry smells more amazing than ever. (sniff) honey, isn't that the dog's towel? (dog noise) hey, mi towel, su towel. more scent plus oxi boost and febreze. it's our best gain ever! we've been changing things up witoh yeah.ve. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like... dare to feel more with new k-y love. bill's got a very tough 13lie here...... looks like we have some sort of sea monster in the water hazard here. i believe that's a "kraken", bruce. it looks like he's going to go with a nine iron. that may not be enough club... well he's definitely going to lose a stroke on this hole. if you're a golf commentator, you whisper. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance,
3:39 am
you switch to geico. it's what you do. this golf course is electric... covergdraw attention way to perfect point liner smudge with sponge-tip to create a smokin' kitten eye lash blast mascara adds an instant blast of volume add a pow to your brow! wow! from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl
3:40 am
ukraine will be at the top of the agenda when russian president vladamir putin sits down with president obama next week. both in new york for the united nations general assembly. before his speech to the u.n., putin sat down for a chat with charlie rose for "60 minutes." you are much talked about in america. there is much conversation. more so than -- >> maybe they have nothing else to do in america but talk about me. >> no, no, no. or maybe they're curious people. or maybe your's an interesting character. maybe that's what it is. as you know, some have called you a czar. >> translator: so what. you know people call me different names. >> does the name fit?
3:41 am
>> translator: no, it does not fit me. it's not important how i am called. either well wishers, friends or political opponents. it is important what you think about you. what you must do for the interest of the country which has entrusted you with the position as the head of the russian state. >> are you curious about america? more than simply another nation that you have to deal with? >> of course we are curious about what is going on. america exerts enormous influence on the situation in the world as a whole. >> what do you admire most about america? >> translator: i like the creativity. >> creativity? >> translator: creativity when it comes to your tackling problems. their openness, open mindedness. because it allows them to
3:42 am
unleash the inner potential of their people. and thanks to that, america has attained such amazing results in developing their country. donald trump continues to lead the pack in the race for the gop presidential nomination. on the campaign trail, mr. trump has highlighted many of his business successes, including trump university. but the new york attorney general says the school is a scam. cbs news conducted its own investigation. and julianna goldman has the results. >> reporter: donald trump has become the republican front-runner because of his reputation as a businessman who gets things done. that brought several lawsuits unu related to trump university which his lawyer says would extend into a potential trump administration. >> what i was looking for was guidance into how to finance real estate transactions.
3:43 am
>> reporter: in 2010, former transit worker gary smith was unemployed and desperate to make money. he saw an ad for trump university and turned to a then brand. >> i thought he was like, you know, kind of a top-notch, guru of sorts. >> reporter: he was a big draw for you? >> definitely. >> reporter: smith spent more than $35,000 on trump university and contacted the attorney general of new york after he heard about its $40 million lawsuit against trump claiming the billionaire defrauded students and made an estimated $5 million. >> i didn't want to put my name on anything having to do with education unless it was going to be the best. >> reporter: trump university began in 2004. in 2007 it started offering live events around the country. >> if you don't learn from the people we will be putting forward, all people that are hand picked by me. >> reporter: cbs news found three instructors had previously filed for bankruptcy, others like smith's instructor, james harris. >> people call me the money
3:44 am
motivator -- were motivational speakers, paid on commission to sell additional trump training. cbs news verified at least 17 affidavits specifically mention harris who was hired in 2008. while thousands attended the three-day, $1,500 seminar around the country. the company's main revenue source was extended $35,000 mentorship, called the trump gold elite package. smith and other former students told cbs news instructors urged them to increase the credit limit on their credit card for investing and to fund their training. one former student's affidavit read when people said they did not have enough money to pay for the trump elite program, mr. harris suggested using newly increased credit card limit. >> certainly wasn't something that was encouraged or implemented. across the board. >> alan garten is trump's attorney. >> unfortunately, i think with any business you are going to get some students who aren't satisfied. >> reporter: former student gary smith was told he would get support from real estate mentors but says they didn't
3:45 am
deliver. smith concedes he gave positive reviews to two mentors even writing here, i am very optimistic i will be a very successful real estate investor the in the future. >> can you point to any financial gain? >> i didn't get any financial gain. and it's been a big time net loss at this point the. >> people have to take responsibility for themselves and use the tools and move forward. as far as just simply, mr. trump is rich and should refund everyone money, trump university was not a charitable institution. >> reporter: internal 2010 memo shows trump employees acknowledged the mentor program was too difficult to fulfill and expectations are not realistically set or met. the school stopped accepting students and winding down in summer 2010. >> at trump university we teach success. >> reporter: trump's attorney cites surveys showing 98% satisfaction rate. court documents indicate of 6,700 students who signed up for the three day seminar or more,
3:46 am
40% received a refund. garten says it is in no way indicative of satisfaction. he says it demonstrates trump's university's refund policy. >> we provided students with valuable resources. with online instruction. in person training. mentoring, seminars, curriculum. and smith says what drew him to trump university isn't so different from the front-runner's presidential campaign. >> behind that, the veneer is to me like, somebody that probably could care less for, the average person, and, you know people that, you know, he is dealing with in general. i think it is all about him. >> reporter: in that speech yesterday, trump said that he had intend to give the profits from trump university to charity. a few students we spoke with said the program was worthwhile.
3:47 am
one man in new jersey, who did not want to be named. said the $35,000 he paid got him hands on knowledge to start his own real so when my husband started getting better dental checkups than me, i decided to go pro... with crest pro-health advanced. my mouth is getting healthier. my teeth are getting stronger. this crest toothpaste is superior in five areas. great checkup.
3:48 am
♪ it's the final countdown! ♪ ♪ the final countdown! if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. we've been changing things up witoh yeah.ve. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like... dare to feel more with new k-y love.
3:49 am
pope francis' historic speech before congress did not meet the approval of some conservatives. the pope's call for responses to immigration and global warming
3:50 am
issues were at odd with some conservative thinking on those particular issues. he also condemned the arms trade and called for an end to capital punishment worldwide. here's nancy cordes. >> mr. speaker, the pope of the holy sea. >> reporter: the first pope ever to set foot in the capitol was greeted with applause. like any good guest, he started out with a compliment, saying he was glad to be -- >> in the land of the free and the home of the brave. [ applause ] >> reporter: and then the argentinian-born pope waded into many issues that divide the lawmakers. urging them to reject what he called a mind set of hostility when it comes to illegal immigrants and refugees. >> we, the people of this continent are not fearful of
3:51 am
foreigners. because most of us -- [ applause ] -- because most of us were once foreigners. >> reporter: he also called on congress to combat climate change. an issue dear to many democrats. >> i am convinced that we can make a difference. i am sure. >> reporter: on social issues, the pope said every life is sacred. a reference to both abortion and to the death penalty which he argued should be abolished. >> i am convinced that this way is the best. >> reporter: and he seemed to be referring to same-sex marriage when he said this. >> fundamental relations have been called into question, the very basis of marriage and the family.
3:52 am
>> reporter: house speaker john boehner, who is catholic, invited the pope last spring. as he waited to greet him this morning, boehner worked hard to hold back tears and succumbed to them repeatedly thereafter as he and the nation's first catholic vice president flanked the pope on the dais. later on the speaker's balcony, boehner was overcome again as the pope blessed a crowd of thousands gathered on the national mall and asked them to pray for him. >> thank you very much. and god bless america. one word the pope used repeatedly today was dialogue. he said, good leaders promote peace by engaging in it. and several lawmakers told us that's the message that we'll stick with them since they work in a place, scott, where people tend to talk past each other. pope francis has earned the
3:53 am
reputation as the people's pope, routinely wading into adoring crowd to kiss babies and offer blessings. he even has a signal for the driver of his popemobile. tapping on the car when he wants to get out. the popemobile itself has an interesting history. here's bill plante. >> for centuries, popes were carried on the shoulders of the faithful. pope paul vi, complained the swaying motion made him seasick. pius xi added vehicles. mercedes-benz gave him a converted limousine. a lincoln continental used for the first papal visit to the u.s. in 1965. but after the assassination attempt on pope john paul ii in 1981, everything and andreas widmer -- >> they put an armored vehicle
3:54 am
around the popemobile. pope john paul didn't care for the name popemobile. he thought it undignified. wherever the pope went you would find the popemobile. and popes have chaffeed at security measures. pope francis called the popemobile a glass sardine can. >> it needs to optimize his security not hindering his ministry. if you don't let the pope do his ministry he is not the pope any more. >> reporter: the popemobile francis is using on his trip in the united states is a especially built jeep wrangler, open and unarmored. allowing crowd in washington, d.c., new york, and philadelphia, to feel that much closer to him. that might keep security officials up at night. but not the pope. he told an interviewer "it's true that anything could happen." but he added, "let's face it, at
3:55 am
my age i don't have much to lose." bill plante, cbs news, washington.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
3:56 am
3:57 am
the grinding civil war in syria touched off the largest human migration since world war ii. entire towns have been reduced to rubble. and ancient antiquities have been destroyed. at least one thing has managed to survive, a seed bank, shipped out of the country for safe keeping near the arctic circle. elizabeth palmer reports for "cbs this morning." >> this story starts in the city of aleppo in syria at a research center developing crops, grain for dry land farming. but fighting in and around aleppo, some of the fiercest in the conflict threatened the center and its seeds. so staff sent a shipment to the safest place they could think
3:58 am
of, the global seed vault inside a freezing mountain in norway. professor carrie fowler is the founder. >> the international center for research in dry areas had taken precaution of duplicating seed collection and placing a duplicate copy near the north pole for safe keeping for a circumstance like this. >> reporter: the vault located above the arctic circle was built to with stand an earthquake or nuclear strike. it is designed as the ultimate archive of plant biodiversity. and this is where the syrian seeds were stored, preserved and protected. while back in syria, fighting forced the research sent our to close. there is good news, it's just reopened in neighboring lebanon. and staff have asked the vault if they can have their precious seed back. absolutely says dr. fowler. >> sending the seeds back is a -- should be a fairly easy
3:59 am
enterprise, we'll book tickets for them on the airplane. we will track it all along the way. it will go back to the owner. >> now, that the vault has shown how essential it can be in an duplicate set of those syrian seeds to send back to norway for safe keeping. this time for good. >> that's the "cbs overnight news." for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning. "from the cbs news broadcast center in new york, i'm jim axelrod.
4:00 am
♪ it's friday, september 25th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." pope francis takes new york city by storm. another jam packed day is in store with a visit to the u.n. after making a historic address before congress. breaking overnight, severe weather wallops the southeast. a likely tornado shreds neighborhoods near charleston, south carolina. and tour bus tragedy. at least four students are killed when a duck boat collides with their charter b

141 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on